Behind HSPower

(First northern light experience in Alta, Norway)

Hello! / Salut! / Hei du! 

Me?

Elliott here! French citizen, living in Oslo. You may be wondering what a Frenchy is doing in Norway for several years? Well, after my studies in environmental biology with a plan to do research in biodiversity (that never happened!), I decided to experience life abroad in order to see what I wanted actually to do in this world. Until then, I have been working in education and in animal health welfare as well as involved in several projects in NGOs and startups related to cultural diversity, environmental awareness and sustainability.

Why “HSPower”?

Early 2018, I discovered the concept of highly sensitivity and highly sensitive people (HSP) and, that I was one of them! Despite the fact that 1/5 of the population is on average HSP, there is a lack of awareness and a lot of misconceptions about it. First, scientific research on sensitivity at a neurological level is still at early stages. But also at a societal level, sensitivity is often associated to a weakness. HSPs, being often related to a high level of  empathy and creativity, are usually condemned to bury their differences, in order to cope with a “monochromatic” society rather than cultivate their gifts.

HSPower`s goals

Today with one of the major crisis we are facing, climate change, I am more than convinced that we must be creative and use all the tools we own, such as our diversity! Therefore, I have decided to take this new exciting adventure in order to understand better the potential of HSPs and how to empower them. In order to do so, I created HSPower, where I invite you to see the world through my eyes, an HSP keen to social and environmental positive change. Meet me halfway for exchanging views and learning from each other! However, I trust my content can be useful to every person out there, regardless if someone is HSP or not, who is willing to keep an open stance to diversity and take action for positive change.

See ya! / @+! / Vi ses!

(Proudly posing with my setesdal kofte, a traditional Norwegian sweater)